The Latest Posts Block, Query Loop Block & Alternatives

Blog posts are usually displayed on a WordPress website either on the homepage, or on a separate blog page if that’s been specified in the site’s setttings. WordPress also creates archive pages for categories and tags. Some themes will provide options so that you can control the look of the blog and archive pages. For example, GeneratePress Premium has a blog add-on with lots of settings. GP Premium also includes advanced features enabling you to use the Block Editor to design archive pages – see the YouTube Video “GeneratePress – Block Element Content Template Demo“.

However, sometimes people want to show some of their posts within the body of another page of the website, or in a widget area.

For the last few years, whenever I’ve wanted to display a list of selected posts on a WordPress page or post, I’ve turned to the WP Show Posts plugin. But I feel that in general it’s best to use core WordPress blocks when they are sufficient for my purposes and to install plugins only when they add extra features.

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Self-hosted WordPress Versus WordPress.com

One of my favourite ways to think about the difference between WordPress.com and self-hosted WordPress is to compare building a website to building with lego bricks.

If you choose WordPress.com it’s like being given a big bucket of lego bricks and a solid table, in a secure room, to build on.

You can build for free but your table will have advertising posters displayed on its side and you have no control over which adverts are pasted there. You’ll be able to invite friends to come round and admire your model, but the address on the invitation (your domain name) will include the word “WordPress”. There will be a range of different WordPress themes you can use (I’m not sure how that fits the lego analogy) but you can’t install your own.

Buying the relatively cheap Personal plan allows you to get rid of the adverts on the “table” and the WordPress name in your address (although there will still be a discrete WordPress logo in the footer of your website).

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